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Archive for December 2006

NBA Notes: “Big Lead” Comments Hurt the Heart; Mainstream Deviants; “Get Your Hand Out My Pocket”

with 2 comments

I was going to write a post about an entirely different subject, but as I was checking out my sports news reader I saw The Big Lead’sThe Posts You Most Loved, Revisited.” I generally dislike these end-of-the-year list articles (The BL’s post I definitely enjoy), particularly when I can tell the author is performing fellatio on an author at a large media outlet like Sports Illustrated or ESPN in order to score some points and get a link-back mention; it’s sad – and a little perverse.

Now, where was I? Oh yeah, the Big Lead posts. I read some of the topics from “The Posts You Love…” and noticed I was an active participant in one of their oft-commented pieces, “Got It. When the Sports Is Hockey, Fighters are “Retaliating.” When it’s Basketball, They are Thugs.” The post dealt with the hub-bub surrounding the New York Knicks-Denver Nuggets fight. I dubbed it a “sorta-fight” because there were no major blows being thrown – and it certainly wasn’t the “brawl” it was purported to be.

What is intriguing about the post is realizing how far people will go to protest the fact that racism is more than alive and well in America and can be clearly noticed in sports and the mainstream media as well as spectator reactions to various “incidents.” With the MSG sorta-fight there was the reaction to Knicks’ color commentator Walt Frazier saying, “You could hear Carmelo’s punch all the way over here!” comment. I actually heard the commentary from Frazier and Mike Breen while the fight was taking place. Breen made enough noise for both men with his statements. Frazier, meanwhile, stayed relatively cool, as he always does. His only real comment made in horror was the “You could hear Carmelo’s punch…” statement. However, leave it to Richard Sandomir of the New York Times to claim that Frazier wasn’t sufficiently vociferous in his horror:

Walt Frazier, Breen’s partner, had as much time and as many openings to register outrage, but he offered none. To listen to Frazier’s words and tone, you’d think that nothing especially unusual had occurred; he even chuckled about the fines and suspensions that were certain to be imposed.

Breen did precisely what he had to do. He repeatedly scorned the Knicks’ Mardy Collins for the flagrant foul he committed on J. R. Smith, the play that started the melee. He voiced concern at how close the brawling had come to fans on a night when many youngsters were at Madison Square Garden. He fulminated about the combatants’ “horrible decision-making,” but he showed enough sense to say that maybe not all were guilty….

While Breen demonstrated his professionalism, Frazier, who survives at MSG because he is a Knicks hero, not a competent analyst, offered almost nothing. He was such a superfluous presence that he might have stayed home to study his thesaurus. He described Anthony’s punch as so loud you could (a) “hear it down here, folks” or (b) “throughout the arena.” He described how the roundhouse punch “cold-cocked” Collins.

Through several replays, Frazier offered no opinion stronger than that “the only beneficiary of this folly will be the charities that the money will go to,” referring to the fines to be levied by the National Basketball Association. He then laughed after saying that the ejection of all 10 players on the court would “send a signal for how severe the penalties will be for this.”

Frazier laughed because he knows that players today respond to one thing when it comes to punishment: losing money. And listening to Frazier, the laugh was one of knowing, not one of hilarity. Somehow, though this escaped Sandomir.

On the Internet, Frazier’s nuanced laughter also escaped Henry Abbott at True Hoop. Abbott is about as mainstream as it gets for NBA blog posts and perhaps more read than many mainstream sources. His take was equally disappointing:

Clyde was part of the broadcast crew at this game on Saturday, and though his partner Mike Breen was clearly against the punches and the hard fouls, Frazier couldn’t bring himself to take much of a stand. Instead he mused about how loud Anthony’s punch was when it connected with Mardy Collins’ face.

From the lack of understanding by these two “experts” I wonder if these guys actually watch Knicks broadcasts and actually listen to the commentators. From complaints I read about hometown commentators, perhaps not. I listen to them religiously because, despite their flaws and homerisms, these people often relate player and team stories that go unnoticed by major media sources and provide uncommon perspectives on the teams they cover. It’s sad that others don’t appear to do the same or if they do, they don’t care to get the flavor of the announcers.

What’s even worse, though, is when a reporter of Sandomir’s “status” who has access to people like Walt Frazier writes as if he’s at the National Enquirer rather than at the Times. A simple call to Frazier, a few simple questions of Frazier and inclusion of those responses in his column may have allowed him to paint a truer picture of both Breen and Frazier. Instead Sandomir chose to act as a polarizing figure, acting for the general public more like a boxing fight promoter than a journalist, pitting the two announcers against each other.

A final note on the MSG “sorta-fight”:

I just received Jack McCallum’s :07 Seconds Or Less: My Season on the Bench with the Runnin’ and Gunnin’ Phoenix Suns as a late Christmas present. I tend to read books like this one slowly. When a point is made that’s new to me, I’ll sit and think about it until I find a place for it in my head before moving on. I got to pages 68 and 69 where the Phoenix coaching staff is talking about the players being perceived as “soft.” At this point the Suns are down 2-1 to the Lakers in the first round of their playoff series last season. The Lakers obviously feel they can intimidate the Phoenix players – and they are. To make things worse, just before the playoffs began Suns guard Raja Bell, the only enforcer on the team, received a call from the NBA league offices informing him that he was going to be watched closely for dirty play (which substantiates something I’ve said repeatedly about “Mr. Anger Management”). The Suns don’t want to lose Bell, so they feel hamstrung. How do they let the Lakers know that they’re not going to back down?

Assistant coach Alvin Gentry and ex-player and head coach was having a conversation about this subject with Suns’ owner Robert Sarver and has this to say about retaliation tactics:

Eighteen years in the NBA and I can tell you this: It’s [retaliating to another team showing your team up] either in you or it’s not…. coaches don’t have to tell you to do those things, you just do them.”

I was stunned when I read this. So many NBA writers decried the MSG sorta-fight and accused Knicks head coach Isiah Thomas of ordering Mardy Collins’ hard foul on the Nuggets’ J.R. Smith. My thoughts turned to Abbott and True Hoop because he, more than any other writer, print, television, or Internet, made a huge deal about McCallum’s book. Abbott even provided his readers with excerpts from the notes he’d taken concerning the book. However, when it came time to mention this passage and use it to provide a different perspective to the shrill cries of wrong-doing by Thomas, Abbott specifically and any others who read and lauded the book, were conspicuously silent.

It’s just another reminder that it’s become increasingly difficult to take sports writers’ words and motives at face value.

——————

Getting back to The Big Lead post on this topic, I found some of the comments were chilling commentaries on the nature of racism in America in 2006. There was one person in particular whose feelings about black athletes was implied throughout the comments. In the end, though, he allowed his true feelings to emerge from the shadows:

Paulsen [another commenter], please address the Carmelo “No Snitchin” Anthony aspect of this whole thing. ‘Melo *is* a thug. So is Zach Randolph. So is Ruben Patterson. Jason Kidd, beats his wife. Kobe Bryant, alleged rapist, admitted adulterer. The list goes on & on & on. But since these “young black men” (gotta love that phrase) play ball and make a shitload of money and “keep it real,” they get a pass from “black America” — hmmm, I wonder why that is ….

The bottom line is this: it is the players here that made the mistakes. For once in my life I would like to see the “black community” come out and say: you know what, that shit has no place in this game. Isiah and Mardy Collins and Nate Robinson and ‘Melo – they were wrong. They fucked up and should pay their punishments.

I find it humorous that instead of focusing at the actual actions here, you instead shift the focus over to how the media reacts to the whole thing, so you can shout “racism” from the rooftops and hope some of your bullshit actually sticks. Who gives a fuck about the media? Classic move of diverting attention from the real issue here, and not taking responsibility for ones’ (read: black people) actions. No surprise, really.

Sad.

Unfortunately BL’s Jemele Hill post topped the Knick-Nuggs post in that it features elicited both racist and sexist remarks. Check out a sample of the comments:

“i don’t know what to make of this, yet…i have read some of her work, and while it is fine….i dunno…it doesn’t seem special. i predict the novelty will wear off, despite getting all kinds of preferencial[sic] placement such….does she at least look good in a two piece bathing suit?”

—————-

“She’s black and she’s a woman and she “writes” about sports in much the same way Dr. Rev. Michael Eric Dyson Esq. writes about economics.

It’s all about those race checkboxes at big companies like ESPN.

The State News is about as predictably brain-dead liberal a paper as could be written. Not to mention that the quality of writing, spelling and grammar, is still awful to this day. It’s an embarrassment [sic], but coming from a seriously deranged Journalism/English department it’s as good as it can be,” (and yes, this fool mentioned “writing, spelling and grammar” and then misspelled “embarrassment” and ended his comment with a comma…)

——————-

“WTF? 400k?

How nice of ESPN. Fired the one black guy who made sense, now getting even more BOJANGLEY with Hill, who made her name with the asinine “ridin’ wit afaletes” pieces.

Good work.”

———————-

and finally, this one – it’s a gem…

“Sadly I didn’t get to experience Jemele’s MSU commentary but I’m guessing it was very similar, if not identical, to other columnists of her ilk attemping [sic] (and failing) to disguise their anger, even hatred, behind some kind of forced, breezy, substitute-sarcasm-for-humor boilerplate. Kathy Wilson (who proudly titled her column ‘Your Negro Tour Guide’) in Cincinnati’s CityBeat alternative newsweekly is another example.

I call them “funnel” columns – any subject, any locale, any event discussed at the start of the column (the wide end of the funnel) will inevitably end up being yet another tired race rant (the narrow end).

I remember my first Jemele column. She must have seen the ESPN SportsCentury segment on Tiger Woods where Christine Brennan (the conscience of America) was basically unhappy that Tiger Woods wasn’t “doing enough” in charity and social endeavors (a fair point as long as you ignore the untold millions Tiger has spent/raised for First Tee and just about every other cause). Jemele picked up this thread and wrote an entire column grumping that Tiger won’t do an Ali or Ashe. Of course, she misses the entire point that this isn’t 1967 or 1970 and that many (most?) of us have moved on and don’t particularly care what race an athlete is – isn’t that supposed to be the goal? Not good enough for Jemele – she wants Tiger to call Al Sharpton on his mobile and get a good old fashioned march going – for what cause we’re not exactly sure but people like Jemele have nostalgia for things they never even experienced. Of course, they have been taught from day one that racism pervades society and that protest should be an everyday thing – even when it doesn’t and it shouldn’t.”

Damn.

———————-

Finally, I got major beef headed into the new year. The beef is with a certain sports writer who feels it’s within his bounds to, as a white dude, speak for black people without first consulting the black athletes he speaks for, or consult with a sample wide enough to gain a truer understanding of the topics on which he writes.

That writer is Dave Zirin (his website is called “The Edge of Sports”).

Howard Zinn, author of “A People’s History of the United States” asked your punk-ass to write a sports equivalent to his book. Then again, Zinn is just another in a litany of crackers making good by standing on the shoulders of minority peoples’ persevering in the face of the Western imperialist – and yes of course, racist – world in which we must endure. Unbelievable – and at the same time all too normal.

However, there are some of us out there, black people that is, who are seriously tired of white dudes like you who made and continue to make their way into the mainstream as spokespeople for black folks. I want to let you know you don’t, can’t, and won’t ever, ever speak for me – ever, feel me?

I pray that one of your punk-boy emissaries passes this along to you so you know for sure that Stephen A. Fetchit putting you on “Quite Stankly” to provide viewers with the “black perspective” doesn’t mean shit. And no, I don’t give a shit that you write for Slam, either. To me, they just took a known name over hundreds of people with real-ness. All I can say is, oh well, choices like that’ll come back to haunt ya in the end.

You see, assholes like you know too many black folks are still just one step removed from being house niggers and love it way too much when a white person wants to “be down” – they’ll let you in their homes, their world, and then go tell all their friends how elevated their status is because a white person chose them to talk to – ask Bill Clinton if you don’t believe this is the way it works.

Now you break bread with slaves like Fetchit and Jason “Houseboy” Whitlock. You let them tell you how all those other black people are the slaves, the ones who “ruin it for the rest of us” and, in turn, you appeal to their fragile egos by telling them in so many words that “they’re black guys, not niggers like most of ‘them’.”

What’s even sadder (and it’s not more sad, for all you grammar-challenged fucks) is that it’s 2006, almost 07, and black writers who want to say something real without being shit on by white people too scared to practice self-examination when it comes to their views of race and people of color and by Uncle Toms and Tomettes, are still relegated to places like “AOL Black Voices” and The “Black Sports Network.” It’s maddening that in the 21st century what I am typing at this very moment still can’t truly be part and parcel of the “mainstream;” gotta have that “Black” qualifier to make sure people know that what is critical of Western culture’s dominion “doesn’t reflect the views and opinions” of whatever website, newspaper, magazine, or TV network (to rap music listeners – why do you think “Soul on Ice” by Ras Kass went out of print in 90 days and, to this day, you have to fight tooth and nail to get your hands on what is the greatest and most politically-charged rap album of all time?!)

The last words Malcolm X heard before he was gunned down by FBI-trained, Elijah Muhammad-sanctioned assassins are the same words I want to pass along to you, Zirin: “Get your hand out my pocket.”

Written by dwil

December 31, 2006 at 12:24 pm

Posted in Blogroll

NBA Notes: “Big Lead” Comments Hurt the Heart; Mainstream Deviants; “Get Your Hand Out My Pocket”

with 10 comments

I was going to write a post about an entirely different subject, but as I was checking out my sports news reader I saw The Big Lead’sThe Posts You Most Loved, Revisited.” I generally dislike these end-of-the-year list articles (The BL’s post I definitely enjoy), particularly when I can tell the author is performing fellatio on an author at a large media outlet like Sports Illustrated or ESPN in order to score some points and get a link-back mention; it’s sad – and a little perverse.

Now, where was I? Oh yeah, the Big Lead posts. I read some of the topics from “The Posts You Love…” and noticed I was an active participant in one of their oft-commented pieces, “Got It. When the Sports Is Hockey, Fighters are “Retaliating.” When it’s Basketball, They are Thugs.” The post dealt with the hub-bub surrounding the New York Knicks-Denver Nuggets fight. I dubbed it a “sorta-fight” because there were no major blows being thrown – and it certainly wasn’t the “brawl” it was purported to be.

What is intriguing about the post is realizing how far people will go to protest the fact that racism is more than alive and well in America and can be clearly noticed in sports and the mainstream media as well as spectator reactions to various “incidents.” With the MSG sorta-fight there was the reaction to Knicks’ color commentator Walt Frazier saying, “You could hear Carmelo’s punch all the way over here!” comment. I actually heard the commentary from Frazier and Mike Breen while the fight was taking place. Breen made enough noise for both men with his statements. Frazier, meanwhile, stayed relatively cool, as he always does. His only real comment made in horror was the “You could hear Carmelo’s punch…” statement. However, leave it to Richard Sandomir of the New York Times to claim that Frazier wasn’t sufficiently vociferous in his horror:

Walt Frazier, Breen’s partner, had as much time and as many openings to register outrage, but he offered none. To listen to Frazier’s words and tone, you’d think that nothing especially unusual had occurred; he even chuckled about the fines and suspensions that were certain to be imposed.

Breen did precisely what he had to do. He repeatedly scorned the Knicks’ Mardy Collins for the flagrant foul he committed on J. R. Smith, the play that started the melee. He voiced concern at how close the brawling had come to fans on a night when many youngsters were at Madison Square Garden. He fulminated about the combatants’ “horrible decision-making,” but he showed enough sense to say that maybe not all were guilty….

While Breen demonstrated his professionalism, Frazier, who survives at MSG because he is a Knicks hero, not a competent analyst, offered almost nothing. He was such a superfluous presence that he might have stayed home to study his thesaurus. He described Anthony’s punch as so loud you could (a) “hear it down here, folks” or (b) “throughout the arena.” He described how the roundhouse punch “cold-cocked” Collins.

Through several replays, Frazier offered no opinion stronger than that “the only beneficiary of this folly will be the charities that the money will go to,” referring to the fines to be levied by the National Basketball Association. He then laughed after saying that the ejection of all 10 players on the court would “send a signal for how severe the penalties will be for this.”

Frazier laughed because he knows that players today respond to one thing when it comes to punishment: losing money. And listening to Frazier, the laugh was one of knowing, not one of hilarity. Somehow, though this escaped Sandomir.

On the Internet, Frazier’s nuanced laughter also escaped Henry Abbott at True Hoop. Abbott is about as mainstream as it gets for NBA blog posts and perhaps more read than many mainstream sources. His take was equally disappointing:

Clyde was part of the broadcast crew at this game on Saturday, and though his partner Mike Breen was clearly against the punches and the hard fouls, Frazier couldn’t bring himself to take much of a stand. Instead he mused about how loud Anthony’s punch was when it connected with Mardy Collins’ face.

From the lack of understanding by these two “experts” I wonder if these guys actually watch Knicks broadcasts and actually listen to the commentators. From complaints I read about hometown commentators, perhaps not. I listen to them religiously because, despite their flaws and homerisms, these people often relate player and team stories that go unnoticed by major media sources and provide uncommon perspectives on the teams they cover. It’s sad that others don’t appear to do the same or if they do, they don’t care to get the flavor of the announcers.

What’s even worse, though, is when a reporter of Sandomir’s “status” who has access to people like Walt Frazier writes as if he’s at the National Enquirer rather than at the Times. A simple call to Frazier, a few simple questions of Frazier and inclusion of those responses in his column may have allowed him to paint a truer picture of both Breen and Frazier. Instead Sandomir chose to act as a polarizing figure, acting for the general public more like a boxing fight promoter than a journalist, pitting the two announcers against each other.

A final note on the MSG “sorta-fight”:

I just received Jack McCallum’s :07 Seconds Or Less: My Season on the Bench with the Runnin’ and Gunnin’ Phoenix Suns as a late Christmas present. I tend to read books like this one slowly. When a point is made that’s new to me, I’ll sit and think about it until I find a place for it in my head before moving on. I got to pages 68 and 69 where the Phoenix coaching staff is talking about the players being perceived as “soft.” At this point the Suns are down 2-1 to the Lakers in the first round of their playoff series last season. The Lakers obviously feel they can intimidate the Phoenix players – and they are. To make things worse, just before the playoffs began Suns guard Raja Bell, the only enforcer on the team, received a call from the NBA league offices informing him that he was going to be watched closely for dirty play (which substantiates something I’ve said repeatedly about “Mr. Anger Management”). The Suns don’t want to lose Bell, so they feel hamstrung. How do they let the Lakers know that they’re not going to back down?

Assistant coach Alvin Gentry and ex-player and head coach was having a conversation about this subject with Suns’ owner Robert Sarver and has this to say about retaliation tactics:

Eighteen years in the NBA and I can tell you this: It’s [retaliating to another team showing your team up] either in you or it’s not…. coaches don’t have to tell you to do those things, you just do them.”

I was stunned when I read this. So many NBA writers decried the MSG sorta-fight and accused Knicks head coach Isiah Thomas of ordering Mardy Collins’ hard foul on the Nuggets’ J.R. Smith. My thoughts turned to Abbott and True Hoop because he, more than any other writer, print, television, or Internet, made a huge deal about McCallum’s book. Abbott even provided his readers with excerpts from the notes he’d taken concerning the book. However, when it came time to mention this passage and use it to provide a different perspective to the shrill cries of wrong-doing by Thomas, Abbott specifically and any others who read and lauded the book, were conspicuously silent.

It’s just another reminder that it’s become increasingly difficult to take sports writers’ words and motives at face value.

——————

Getting back to The Big Lead post on this topic, I found some of the comments were chilling commentaries on the nature of racism in America in 2006. There was one person in particular whose feelings about black athletes was implied throughout the comments. In the end, though, he allowed his true feelings to emerge from the shadows:

Paulsen [another commenter], please address the Carmelo “No Snitchin” Anthony aspect of this whole thing. ‘Melo *is* a thug. So is Zach Randolph. So is Ruben Patterson. Jason Kidd, beats his wife. Kobe Bryant, alleged rapist, admitted adulterer. The list goes on & on & on. But since these “young black men” (gotta love that phrase) play ball and make a shitload of money and “keep it real,” they get a pass from “black America” — hmmm, I wonder why that is ….

The bottom line is this: it is the players here that made the mistakes. For once in my life I would like to see the “black community” come out and say: you know what, that shit has no place in this game. Isiah and Mardy Collins and Nate Robinson and ‘Melo – they were wrong. They fucked up and should pay their punishments.

I find it humorous that instead of focusing at the actual actions here, you instead shift the focus over to how the media reacts to the whole thing, so you can shout “racism” from the rooftops and hope some of your bullshit actually sticks. Who gives a fuck about the media? Classic move of diverting attention from the real issue here, and not taking responsibility for ones’ (read: black people) actions. No surprise, really.

Sad.

Unfortunately BL’s Jemele Hill post topped the Knick-Nuggs post in that it features elicited both racist and sexist remarks. Check out a sample of the comments:

“i don’t know what to make of this, yet…i have read some of her work, and while it is fine….i dunno…it doesn’t seem special. i predict the novelty will wear off, despite getting all kinds of preferencial[sic] placement such….does she at least look good in a two piece bathing suit?”

—————-

“She’s black and she’s a woman and she “writes” about sports in much the same way Dr. Rev. Michael Eric Dyson Esq. writes about economics.

It’s all about those race checkboxes at big companies like ESPN.

The State News is about as predictably brain-dead liberal a paper as could be written. Not to mention that the quality of writing, spelling and grammar, is still awful to this day. It’s an embarrassment [sic], but coming from a seriously deranged Journalism/English department it’s as good as it can be,” (and yes, this fool mentioned “writing, spelling and grammar” and then misspelled “embarrassment” and ended his comment with a comma…)

——————-

“WTF? 400k?

How nice of ESPN. Fired the one black guy who made sense, now getting even more BOJANGLEY with Hill, who made her name with the asinine “ridin’ wit afaletes” pieces.

Good work.”

———————-

and finally, this one – it’s a gem…

“Sadly I didn’t get to experience Jemele’s MSU commentary but I’m guessing it was very similar, if not identical, to other columnists of her ilk attemping [sic] (and failing) to disguise their anger, even hatred, behind some kind of forced, breezy, substitute-sarcasm-for-humor boilerplate. Kathy Wilson (who proudly titled her column ‘Your Negro Tour Guide’) in Cincinnati’s CityBeat alternative newsweekly is another example.

I call them “funnel” columns – any subject, any locale, any event discussed at the start of the column (the wide end of the funnel) will inevitably end up being yet another tired race rant (the narrow end).

I remember my first Jemele column. She must have seen the ESPN SportsCentury segment on Tiger Woods where Christine Brennan (the conscience of America) was basically unhappy that Tiger Woods wasn’t “doing enough” in charity and social endeavors (a fair point as long as you ignore the untold millions Tiger has spent/raised for First Tee and just about every other cause). Jemele picked up this thread and wrote an entire column grumping that Tiger won’t do an Ali or Ashe. Of course, she misses the entire point that this isn’t 1967 or 1970 and that many (most?) of us have moved on and don’t particularly care what race an athlete is – isn’t that supposed to be the goal? Not good enough for Jemele – she wants Tiger to call Al Sharpton on his mobile and get a good old fashioned march going – for what cause we’re not exactly sure but people like Jemele have nostalgia for things they never even experienced. Of course, they have been taught from day one that racism pervades society and that protest should be an everyday thing – even when it doesn’t and it shouldn’t.”

Damn.

———————-

Finally, I got major beef headed into the new year. The beef is with a certain sports writer who feels it’s within his bounds to, as a white dude, speak for black people without first consulting the black athletes he speaks for, or consult with a sample wide enough to gain a truer understanding of the topics on which he writes.

That writer is Dave Zirin (his website is called “The Edge of Sports”).

Howard Zinn, author of “A People’s History of the United States” asked your punk-ass to write a sports equivalent to his book. Then again, Zinn is just another in a litany of crackers making good by standing on the shoulders of minority peoples’ persevering in the face of the Western imperialist – and yes of course, racist – world in which we must endure. Unbelievable – and at the same time all too normal.

However, there are some of us out there, black people that is, who are seriously tired of white dudes like you who made and continue to make their way into the mainstream as spokespeople for black folks. I want to let you know you don’t, can’t, and won’t ever, ever speak for me – ever, feel me?

I pray that one of your punk-boy emissaries passes this along to you so you know for sure that Stephen A. Fetchit putting you on “Quite Stankly” to provide viewers with the “black perspective” doesn’t mean shit. And no, I don’t give a shit that you write for Slam, either. To me, they just took a known name over hundreds of people with real-ness. All I can say is, oh well, choices like that’ll come back to haunt ya in the end.

You see, assholes like you know too many black folks are still just one step removed from being house niggers and love it way too much when a white person wants to “be down” – they’ll let you in their homes, their world, and then go tell all their friends how elevated their status is because a white person chose them to talk to – ask Bill Clinton if you don’t believe this is the way it works.

Now you break bread with slaves like Fetchit and Jason “Houseboy” Whitlock. You let them tell you how all those other black people are the slaves, the ones who “ruin it for the rest of us” and, in turn, you appeal to their fragile egos by telling them in so many words that “they’re black guys, not niggers like most of ‘them’.”

What’s even sadder (and it’s not more sad, for all you grammar-challenged fucks) is that it’s 2006, almost 07, and black writers who want to say something real without being shit on by white people too scared to practice self-examination when it comes to their views of race and people of color and by Uncle Toms and Tomettes, are still relegated to places like “AOL Black Voices” and The “Black Sports Network.” It’s maddening that in the 21st century what I am typing at this very moment still can’t truly be part and parcel of the “mainstream;” gotta have that “Black” qualifier to make sure people know that what is critical of Western culture’s dominion “doesn’t reflect the views and opinions” of whatever website, newspaper, magazine, or TV network (to rap music listeners – why do you think “Soul on Ice” by Ras Kass went out of print in 90 days and, to this day, you have to fight tooth and nail to get your hands on what is the greatest and most politically-charged rap album of all time?!)

The last words Malcolm X heard before he was gunned down by FBI-trained, Elijah Muhammad-sanctioned assassins are the same words I want to pass along to you, Zirin: “Get your hand out my pocket.”

Allen Iverson and Steve Nash – There’s No Comparison as to Who Is Better

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Steve Nash’s Phoenix Suns lost a 101-99 game to the Dallas Mavericks last night. Nash scored 24 points and collected 13 dimes and four boards. It was an excellent performance by the two-time MVP. In fact, Nash’s overall game last night was far better than his average game the last two seasons. In 2004-04 season Stevie Wonderful averaged 15.5 ppg, 11.5 apg, and 3.3 rpg. His 2005-06 stats were even better – 18.8 ppg, 10.5 apg, and 4.2 rpg. As usual Nash’s game against the Mavs brought on the usual ‘Nash for three MVPs in a row’ talk. This season Nash averages are 19.8 ppg, 11.3 apg, and 3.2 rpg.

Now, call me crazy, but there’s someone out there who had a game last night that who made Nash’s performance look average; in fact he’s been doing it all season. His stats last night were 44, 10 and 3. His season stats are 30.5 ppg, 7.8 apg, and 2.6 rpg. Unfortunately, he’s not mentioned in the same breath as Nash.

In fact, grizzled NBA observers openly question his ability to mix with the star of his team and, in the end, his other teammates. Where Nash is seen as scoring when he must, this player is seen as a black hole. Where Nash’s assist totals exemplify his unselfishness, this player’s dime collecting is never mentioned. Nash is said to make his team better by fitting in with his teammates’ various styles of play while it is said the other player’s teammates must adjust to him. In 2004-04 he averaged 30.7 ppg, 7.9 apg, and 4.0 rpg. In 2005-06 he averaged 33.0 ppg, 7.4 apg, and 3.2 rpg. Additionally, this year the other player is averaging 2.3 steals per game while Nash’s average is 0.9.

By the end of the second paragraph you probably guessed that the “other player” is Denver’s Allen Iverson. Iverson’s Philadelphia teams the last two seasons won 44 and 38 games, respectively. With AI’s mediocre supporting cast the case can easily be made that he willed the 76ers to those win totals. Meanwhile Nash played in a much more scoring and assist-friendly offense. To illustrate, Philly’s offense average 99.1 ppg in the 2004-05 season the Phoenix’s 110.4 ppg. In 2005-06, the Sixers per game scoring average was 99.4 while the Suns ran to the tune of 108.4 ppg.

In my estimation there is no comparison between Nash and Iverson. AI played on worse teams and had better overall stats than Nash. This season is the same. In three games with the Nuggets Iverson is averaging 31.3 ppg, 11.0 apg, and 2.3rpg with 2.3 spg. This is happening with new teammates, with passes bouncing off unsuspecting hands and heads.  AI’s stats are large in spite of being matched with no one who can finish with any regularity. He’s doing this without Carmelo Anthony and Marcus Camby.

The complaint about Iverson is that, because of his dominating style of play, he doesn’t make the players around him better. Earl Boykins is averaging13.5 ppg on the season; with AI he’s averaging 25.6 ppg. Reggie Evans’ season ppg is7.1; with AI Evans is at 11 ppg. And those are Iverson’s top two scoring options. Even Eduardo Najara is averaging in double figures (10.1 ppg) since AI’s arrival. Stevie wonderful is trumpeted as the second coming of Bob Cousy and Allen Iverson is labeled as a selfish malcontent. 

You tell me why this is so, though I think I already know – the answer.

Written by dwil

December 29, 2006 at 5:04 am

Posted in Blogroll

Allen Iverson and Steve Nash – There’s No Comparison as to Who Is Better

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Steve Nash’s Phoenix Suns lost a 101-99 game to the Dallas Mavericks last night. Nash scored 24 points and collected 13 dimes and four boards. It was an excellent performance by the two-time MVP. In fact, Nash’s overall game last night was far better than his average game the last two seasons. In 2004-04 season Stevie Wonderful averaged 15.5 ppg, 11.5 apg, and 3.3 rpg. His 2005-06 stats were even better – 18.8 ppg, 10.5 apg, and 4.2 rpg. As usual Nash’s game against the Mavs brought on the usual ‘Nash for three MVPs in a row’ talk. This season Nash averages are 19.8 ppg, 11.3 apg, and 3.2 rpg.

Now, call me crazy, but there’s someone out there who had a game last night that who made Nash’s performance look average; in fact he’s been doing it all season. His stats last night were 44, 10 and 3. His season stats are 30.5 ppg, 7.8 apg, and 2.6 rpg. Unfortunately, he’s not mentioned in the same breath as Nash.

In fact, grizzled NBA observers openly question his ability to mix with the star of his team and, in the end, his other teammates. Where Nash is seen as scoring when he must, this player is seen as a black hole. Where Nash’s assist totals exemplify his unselfishness, this player’s dime collecting is never mentioned. Nash is said to make his team better by fitting in with his teammates’ various styles of play while it is said the other player’s teammates must adjust to him. In 2004-04 he averaged 30.7 ppg, 7.9 apg, and 4.0 rpg. In 2005-06 he averaged 33.0 ppg, 7.4 apg, and 3.2 rpg. Additionally, this year the other player is averaging 2.3 steals per game while Nash’s average is 0.9.

By the end of the second paragraph you probably guessed that the “other player” is Denver’s Allen Iverson. Iverson’s Philadelphia teams the last two seasons won 44 and 38 games, respectively. With AI’s mediocre supporting cast the case can easily be made that he willed the 76ers to those win totals. Meanwhile Nash played in a much more scoring and assist-friendly offense. To illustrate, Philly’s offense average 99.1 ppg in the 2004-05 season the Phoenix’s 110.4 ppg. In 2005-06, the Sixers per game scoring average was 99.4 while the Suns ran to the tune of 108.4 ppg.

In my estimation there is no comparison between Nash and Iverson. AI played on worse teams and had better overall stats than Nash. This season is the same. In three games with the Nuggets Iverson is averaging 31.3 ppg, 11.0 apg, and 2.3rpg with 2.3 spg. This is happening with new teammates, with passes bouncing off unsuspecting hands and heads.  AI’s stats are large in spite of being matched with no one who can finish with any regularity. He’s doing this without Carmelo Anthony and Marcus Camby.

The complaint about Iverson is that, because of his dominating style of play, he doesn’t make the players around him better. Earl Boykins is averaging13.5 ppg on the season; with AI he’s averaging 25.6 ppg. Reggie Evans’ season ppg is7.1; with AI Evans is at 11 ppg. And those are Iverson’s top two scoring options. Even Eduardo Najara is averaging in double figures (10.1 ppg) since AI’s arrival. Stevie wonderful is trumpeted as the second coming of Bob Cousy and Allen Iverson is labeled as a selfish malcontent. 

You tell me why this is so, though I think I already know – the answer.

Written by dwil

December 29, 2006 at 5:04 am

The Real Dope on Barry Bonds and Those Who Would Pursue Him: Part 1

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Barry hits one real far.

The latest news that federal investigators are now allowed to make public positive steroid results – from 2003 – of Major League Baseball players is yet another attempt to find evidence, any evidence no matter how circumstantial, for a grand jury indictment of Barry Bonds. What’s at stake here is the confidentiality agreement made by the players, their union and Commissioner Bud Selig’s league offices, the credibility of a made-for-TV mini-series federal probe, the validity of three years worth of articles and a book written by two San Francisco Chronicle reporters, and untold millions of taxpayer dollars used to conduct this on-going investigation.

I have watched these happenings from the beginning. I saw the raid occur live on television and began to avidly follow the story. When suddenly Barry Bonds was implicated in the swirl of BALCO I began to save every article I could find relating to the subject. Many of the initial reports and exposes, once saved in a monstrous “Favorites” folder have been, for many reasons, removed from the Internet. However, the majority still exist waiting to be used to provide another side of this saga.

As a result of the most recent news, I feel it is time to write a many-part piece offering what I feel is a more realistic view of the motivations behind all of the BALCO-initiated events. I cannot say that I will provide a part of the story each day. I can say there will be at least one post written each week. Each post will be made accessible through individually-linked articles in the upper left corner of the left column of this blog.

I hope these writings give readers pause to consider how they are spoon-fed only the information major media outlets wish to be divulged and how that information is intended to force viewers to give up the ability to form their own opinions, their own perspectives concerning a given event.

The want, wish, and goal of these outlets like CNN, MSNBC, Fox, and ESPN, is to force you not to think at all. Good reading.

———————-

Barry, Barry, they powers that be are really after your behind. How did you get into this mess? If you believe the myth, it began with two dudes, one white IRS agent dude, one black undercover agent, sitting in a bar watching you ball. White IRS dude sees your dark, scowling, sullen face on the screen and flips right out. He tells his black bud he knows you’re on the juice. He knows you’re a dirty, no good for the kids guy.

So the two dudes set out to get you, Barry. They stalk you with the zeal of psycho, jilted lovers. They want you so bad that black undercover agent dude visits the gym where your boy Greg Anderson works and starts to pump up. Black dude pumps and pumps and blows himself down. Really. Dude wants you so badly he kills himself – a stroke – after a pump-up sesh. His white IRS bud who instigated all this, takes up the cause as an ode to his fallen comrade and well, you know the rest. The following is from a Playboy article on the IRS hunt of Barry B.:

To White, Novitzky seemed to have an unusual interest in the ballplayer. He mentioned Bonds frequently after a sighting or a Giants game. One day at court Novitzky struck up a conversation with White that went beyond the usual talk-radio banter.

“That Bonds. He’s a great athlete,” White says Novitzky told him. “You think he’s on steroids?”

White took a moment before replying, in his bourbon-and-cotton voice, “I think they’re all on steroids. All of our top major leaguers.”

Novitzky seemed to care only about Bonds. “He’s such an asshole to the press,” he said. “I’d sure like to prove it.”

The agent, “White,” is black undercover agent dude, Iran White. The white IRS dude is Jeff Novitzky.

———————–

Mark Fainaru-Wada and Lance Williams.

If you believe the San Francisco Chronicle’s “award-winning” authors Lance Williams and Mark Fainaru-Wada, or as ESPN’s Buster Olney calls them, “The Pulitzer Prize-nominated authors” maybe you are just a by-product of an innocuous investigation that ended in a raid of an off-the-beaten-path synthetic performance-enhancing lab in Northern California. But, first thing first, Williams and Fainaru-Wada and Williams’ work on the BALCO case was not Pulitzer Prize-nominated. Oddly, it was Olney, who, in his initial reports that centered on Fainaru-Wada and Williams’ book, “Game of Shadows,” told the sporting world on ESPN News that the author’s articles, submitted to the Pulitzer by the S.F. Chronicle, never made it beyond the initial jury stage to the Pulitzer committee. Their work was deemed by the jury too based upon unsubstantiated and uncorroborated evidence and was therefore not able to be viewed as factual.

Oops.

But back to the innocuous investigation of the little lab that could…. produce track-and-field champions called Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative (BALCO). It was, according to Fainaru-Wada and Williams, a simple “enforcement action” that turned into the biggest sports scandal of the 20th century – or so the not Pulitzer Prize nominees would have the public believe:

It began with what the government called an “enforcement action” at an obscure nutrition laboratory near San Francisco International Airport.

Now, 15 months after two dozen armed agents burst into the Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative — pausing in their search for evidence to view the photos of star athletes that adorned the walls — the federal probe into the suspected steroid mill called BALCO has pushed the topic of sports doping into the consciousness of even the most casual sports fan.

However, the reality of the BALCO raid is far different than the Fainaru-Wada and Williams-created myth. Again, turning to the Playboy article:

Shortly before noon on September 3, 2003, helicopters pound the air over BALCO’s tiny offices. A pack of unmarked sedans surrounds the building. In a move other agencies would later question, IRS agents are told to place IRS placards on the dashboard of their cars. Nearly two dozen agents, several in black IRS flak jackets, along with a doctor the USADA has sent, crowd through BALCO’s front door.

I wonder how many people remember the above scene; I saw the raid live on MSNBC. It was surreal. Not only were federal agent helicopters in the air but agents were sitting in the space that was a door with semi-automatic rifles pointed down on the lab. The unmarked sedans front doors were open with agents kneeling behind them, pistols pointed at the BALCO doors:

“Are these TV cameras?” [Victor Conte] asks, clearly stunned. “How did this happen?”

Many agents — everyone, in fact, who doesn’t work for the IRS — are angered by the publicity. The search of BALCO, which was supposed to remain secret for countless investigative reasons, now resembles an episode of “Cops.” Members of other law enforcement groups are furious at the publicity stunt. The search was designed as a pressure tactic, not as the end of the investigation; there are no plans to arrest Conte, who walks free.

BALCO.

The date, September 3, 2003 is important because the two Chronicle reporters who became famous as a result of the bust didn’t write their first BALCO story until December 21. 2003. That first article titled, “Sports and Drugs: How the doping scandal unfolded. Fallout from BALCO Probe could taint Olympics, pro sports” made no mention of the IRS and federal agents’ police reality show-like atmosphere that was the BALCO raid.

What chemicals were confiscated from BALCO by federal agents as a direct result of the raid illustrates the true lack of importance of BALCO relative to the designer steroid world of elite professional athletes. Taken from the lab were vials, and pills. The vials, no more than a dozen of them mainly contained supplements in liquid form and two out-of-date vials (by about 10 years) of a horse steroid. The pills were all the Zinc-Magnesium compound touted by Conte as a performance-enhancing mineral supplement. No THG, clear, cream, or other commonly-used steroid or performance-enhancing drugs were confiscated from Conte’s laboratory.

Think of that. Nothing illegal in the way of performance-enhancing drugs was confiscated from the BALCO offices.

Instead of immediately asking why the probe continued without physical evidence or asking why and how IRS agents were able to enter BALCO without a warrant, or instead of asking myriad questions dealing with government improprieties in relation to the BALCO bust, Fainaru-Wada and Williams show their hand immediately, show who they decided this case would center around, who they would attempt to publicly hang. Come hell or high water, whether right or wrong, and no matter how they had to spin the story Mark Fainaru-Wada and Lance Williams, like Jeff Novizky and Iran White, were going to take Barry Bonds down. The initial paragraphs of their initial BALCO story elucidate their goal:

Barry Bonds hit a career-high 49 home runs during the 2000 season, but within days of the last game, he set his sights on 2001. A contract year lay ahead for the aging left fielder, a chance to regain the status of baseball’s highest paid player.

Bonds already was doing weight training with Greg Anderson, his boyhood friend. Anderson took him to see Victor Conte, a self-taught scientist who boasted he could propel top-level athletes to peak performance through an unconventional mix of blood analysis and nutritional supplements.

The outfielder returned the next season bigger and stronger. The results are etched in baseball’s record books — and, perhaps, in a transcript of the secret proceedings of a federal grand jury convened in San Francisco this fall.

For while Bonds’ alliance with the weight trainer and the nutritionist may have helped him hit 73 home runs in 2001 — breaking baseball’s most storied record and persuading the Giants to offer him a $90 million contract – – it also involved him in what may become the worst sports doping scandal of a generation.

It is a scandal involving high-tech designer steroids and masking agents, human growth hormone and suspected money laundering, drugs with code names like “the cream” and “the clear,” and a mystery chemist who concocted a new performance-enhancing drug called THG.

And with these introductory paragraphs, Mark Fainaru-Wada and Lance Williams zeroed in and identified their prey – and had visions of the Pulitzer dancing in their heads.

(Part 2: Steroid disinformation becomes truth.)

In a Stretch, Feds Reach for Barry Bonds Once Again

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Barry Bonds continues to be dogged by a farcical federal investigation thinly-veiled as the BALCO probe. The following is from a Houston Chronicle News Services article:

…federal investigators can now use the names and urine samples of about 100 Major League Baseball players in their steroids probe, following a ruling Wednesday from a federal appeals court.

The 2-1 decision by the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals overturned three lower court decisions and could help authorities pinpoint the source of steroids in baseball. It could also bolster the perjury case against Bonds, who is under investigation for telling a grand jury he never knowingly used performance-enhancing drugs.

Apparently the goal of this decision is to uncover more athletes who worked with Barry Bonds’ ex-strength trainer and long-time friend, Greg Anderson. The feds somehow feel that if enough MLB players worked with Anderson they can use this as circumstantial, albeit weak, evidence to bring perjury charges against Bonds.

Armed with data from both labs, government officials now can match the positive test samples with the players’ names. Those players then could be called before a grand jury and asked how they obtained their steroids.

If enough testify that they got the drugs from Bonds’ personal trainer, Greg Anderson, it could undermine Bonds’ claim that he didn’t know Anderson was supplying him with illegal substances.

The courts have now gone beyond attempting to trample on the feats of Bonds. They have infringed on agreed to rights of every MLB player.

The question is, how do Major League Baseball players trust their union now that an appeals court has ruled that their steroid tests taken in 2002, which were conducted under promise the of confidentiality, are to be made public.

(I’ll have much more on this soon.)

Written by dwil

December 28, 2006 at 6:54 am

NFL Random Notes – Late Season Whining Explains Why Some Teams Are Thinking Golf, Not Playoffs and Another Is One and Done

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It’s late in the season and apparently the punk is coming out of some NFL players. There’s an uptick on the whining and bitching tip. This is some of what I’ve seen:

* Let’s lead off with Terance Newman, aka Mr. Toastman, of the Dallas Cowboys. Terrell Owens, who has more pass receptions than the entire Atlanta Falcons’ starting receiving corps, is openly taking shots from a starting cornerback who is part of a secondary that’s given up more big pass plays than any other in the NFL:

“Some people just talk a big game, and they think that they are doing the team justice by pumping up themselves and doing a lot of that when the reality is they come out and just get abused. People need to just start playing and stop talking so much. “

When asked who he was talking about, Newman replied not-so-cryptically:

“I’m not going to point out people. That’s not what I do.”

Right, Mr. Toastman.

The ESPN followers are all-too-quick to point out that Owens has dropped 17 passes this season. This stat is just another in a litany of meaningless filler statistical material ESPN trots out for its talent to parrot when they have nothing of substance to provide for their audience. And by the way, 17 drops is basically one per game.

These 17 dropped passes come from a man who, after meeting with owner Jerry Jones, who incidentally asked T.O. to “shut it down” and have surgery on his hand and finger, chose to play out the season with torn tendons in the ring finger of his right hand. Before the Sunday night game with Philadelphia, Chris Collinsworth, a former Cincinnati Bengals’ receiver, noted as video of Owens in pre-game drills rolled, that Owens was catching passes with his palms to avoid the pain of having the ball hit his damaged ring finger. However, this bit of pertinent information somehow eludes every single person and member of a media outlet feeling as though they have a vested interest in attempting to influence NFL teams to blackball the mercurial wideout.

By continuing to play, Owens will have to endure irreparable damage to his hand. In Owens’ case this means for the remainder of his life, T.O. will be unable to fully close his right hand. But rather than laud Owens for playing hurt, leading all NFL receivers with 12 TD receptions, leading his team in yardage and receptions, and catching the sixth-most receptions for first downs, those who would be fools, now including Terrance Mr. Toastman Newman, DB for a secondary and defense that ranks 22 in a 32-team league, choose to rip T.O. for his words. Hey Mr. Toastman, thanks for showing the world that your team is on and done come playoff time

By the way, when did what athletes say become more important than how they perform?

* I’m very surprised that Jacksonville Jaguars’ LB Clint Ingram wasn’t fined for spearing Tom Brady in the back. The hit was borderline late, the head-first hit was meant to put Brady out of the game. It was a punk play by a punk player on a now-outed punk team. While the Jacksonville players have, with great aplomb, eased their way out of the playoffs, the players still find a way to provide their fans with milquetoast comments as if they’re actually playing for something other than bonus money Sunday:

“If you look at the good teams around the league, most of the time, it’s guys that have been playing a number of years together,” [QB David] Garrard said. “You don’t want to wait a number of years to be an elite offense or team, but that goes with it.”

If you think that was insightful, check this quote from Maurice Drew-Jones out:

“If we could play more consistently, we’d be a much better team,” Drew said. “I don’t think anyone can hang with us, but we keep stopping ourselves.”

No duh. Have a nice early off season, Clint, David, Maurice, and the rest of the Jags.

* Miami Dolphins’ DE Jason Taylor needs to shut up and, since his wife, Katina (Zach Thomas’ sister) left his ass, prep for the clubs of SoBe, stay out other peoples’ business., and stop pining for the defensive player of the year award. Taylor has taken it upon himself to act as the NFL’s Bud Selig and cry about San Diego LB Shawne Merriman:

“You really shouldn’t be able to fail a test like that and play in this league, to begin with,” Taylor said Wednesday. “To make the Pro Bowl and all the other awards, I think you’re walking a fine line of sending the wrong message.”

“A performance-enhancing drug is, obviously, what it is,” Taylor said. “You enhance your performance by doing that. You fail that test, I think it’s not right, it’s against the rules and ultimately I think it’s sending the wrong message to the youth in America and the people who look at this game not only as entertainment but also to learn lessons from it.”

And just who was the Miss Garden Tool you were seen with at the Jamie Foxx-hosted Red Cross event in Miami in June, Jason? It sure wasn’t Katina. And you have the nerve to talk about sending the wrong message to kids.

* There’s no, “win one for Coach Cowher” talk in the Pittsburgh Steelers’ locker room. In fact, Steelers’ LB Joey Porter is on record saying as much:

With the Steelers (7-8) now out of playoff contention, the focus for their season-ending game Sunday at Cincinnati has shifted to the possible resignation of Bill Cowher less than 11 months after he coached them to a Super Bowl victory.

Except, it seems, in their own locker room.

“No, that’s not the motivation,” linebacker Joey Porter said Wednesday. “I don’t think nobody is using that because he’s never said anything like that to us. That’s not a motivational speech you can use until somebody says it.”

The way the Steelers have played all season maybe Porter and his boys should have used Cowher’s potential retirement for motivation. Fortunately for the rest of us, we wont’ be subjected to Joey Porter’s constant, ‘this player’s soft, that player’s a bitch’ routine for nine months.

* The mandate from Atlanta Falcons’ owner Arthur Blank to Jim Mora was an 8-8 record is unacceptable and failing to make the playoffs is unacceptable. With one game left in the season Mora’s team is 7-8 and, for all intents and purposes, out of the playoffs. What does Mora do? Attempt to use his prior record as a reason to keep his job:

“I’m proud of this football team. Our football team did some things that are overlooked when you lose a football game. We’ve won the most games in the NFC South for three years. We’ve got the fourth-most wins in the NFC over the last three years. We’ve played in the NFC championship game. We’ve won the NFC South. We’ve been in the hunt through 15 weeks last year and we’re still in the hunt through the last week this year.”

But you’re 7-8 and your team is not making the playoffs. Plus you said that if your team was in the middle of a playoff hunt and you were offered the job as head coach of the Washington Huskies you’d quit your present team and take the Washington job.Just take what’s coming like a man and be prepared to be fired, Mr. Mora.

* New York Giants head coach Tom Coughlin has blamed everyone other than himself for his team losing seven of its last eight games. Coughlin’s favorite whipping boy to this point has been QB Eli Manning. Now, though, Coughlin has switched gears and decided to show the Maras that he’ll fire anyone in order to coach in New York another season. This week Coughlin sacrificed offensive coordinator John Hufnagel, stripping him of his play-calling duties.

“There’s no offensive coordinator,” Coughlin told reporters Tuesday after a brief evening practice at Giants Stadium. “If there would be one, it would be me. Kevin [Gilbride] will be the play-caller and he will head the meetings this week.”

The offensive coordinator heads meetings during the week and calls plays on Sundays, remember Tom? As confused as your team looks I can understand how take the job of offensive coordinator and invent a position called, “play-caller.”

Thankfully after the first round of the playoffs the next Tom Coughlin quotes to be heard will be those of his farewell speech as he “resigns” from the Giants.

* While everyone else is yakkkin’ there’s one person in the NFL who actually needs to do some ‘splainin’ and that would be Miami Dolphins head coach Nick Saban. Sabes, under scrutiny because Alabama refuse to say that Saban has told them that he isn’t interested in the Alabama head coaching job, is now going quiet:

“I’m just making a rule to never comment on something like that again because every time you comment on it, it just makes for another story,” Saban said Wednesday. “So I’m not going to comment on it five years from now, and I’m not going to comment on it next week.”

Hmmm, there’s a lot of time for talk between next week and five years from now, Nick. With $5million a year on the table from ‘Bama, sounds like we’ll hear something from Saban sooner than later.